Posted by: Glenelg Guitar Studio | January 22, 2022

Metronomes for Guitar

I tell every student about the benefit and usage of a metronome in lessons but I’m sure this message from a student will reinforce the benefit.

Hi Leigh

Just a note on the metronome. Yes, I know you are always going on about practicing with the metronome and now I actually think I’ve got it happening.

In the beginning it was difficult. I was trying to read the music, find the notes on the right strings, and get a reasonable sound happening as well as getting the timing right. The whole lot together with the metronome beeping at me was sometimes daunting. Even at a very slow pace, however, I started to improve.

I had most trouble on pieces where there were lots of rests but now I seemed to have improved a lot. I found when I was playing the piece without the metronome I was able to count in my head to follow the beat.

I have been using a couple of metronome apps on my phone and the one I like best is the Iona Voice Metronome which has beeps, male and female voice counting as well as my favourite, a dog barking in time!”

Choose the different modes. Voice , beeps or dog bark

As the author of this message has indicated, a metronome will help you develop a sense of rhythm and constant tempo. Most have the ability to change accent to any beat as well as change the time.

A metronome will make you a better guitarist ie smoother with better technique. You will improve over time and your practice will be more efficient.

Make sure you are using it every practice session.

Please do what this guitarist has done and email me what is working for you in your own practice. I will put your comments up on the website for other guitarists to investigate.

Cheers
Leigh

Posted by: Glenelg Guitar Studio | January 16, 2022

Stretching for Guitarists

When I talk about stretching for guitarists’ it’s normally about increasing the stretch or fret area that you can cover with your fingers. Generally adults can hit 4 frets with their 4 fingers.

However, today it’s not about reach but all about body stretching. If you’re doing your daily practice and not stretching before or after, or both, the start of a new year is a good time to get started.

We sit in one position for extended periods during practice sessions and place a lot of demand on our bodies, so it’s important to break practice into smaller periods, say 15 minutes at a time.

After 15 minutes get up and walk around to get the body moving. Some people like to do a couple of simple arm and shoulder stretches as well during this break. It will depend on your body, your playing position and core strength as to your stretching needs but each body will benefit from working out a short routine of exercises to do.

There is loads of advice about stretching on the internet and YouTube, however Ian (a student of mine) has found one of interest that will suit most students. Check out this LINK to see if you can incorporate some simple stretches into your routine.

I know many of you are already stretching daily, but check out the ones Ian sent me as you may not have seen some of these before-I know there are a few that were new to me. For me it was exercise 6 “The Cossack”.

Please let me know if you find this page helpful and/or what your favourite stretch is.

Finally, my final thought on the subject of stretching and exercise is a saying I came across recently:

Did you know 14 muscles are activated when opening a bottle of wine? Fitness is my passion!

Cheers
Leigh

Posted by: Glenelg Guitar Studio | July 2, 2021

Adelaide Guitar Festival

Yes, it’s on again this year 4th-15th July in Adelaide with performances at the country centres of Edithburgh, Tumby Bay and Cleve.

There’s certainly a wide range of performances of Rock, Blues and Classical so there is bound to be something to suit your taste. I will be checking out some of the classical guitar sessions, which is probably no surprise to any of you.

The Guitar Festival is a great opportunity for students to experience the best that the guitar world has to offer and provide inspiration to you learning experience. You will find inspiration no matter what stage your learning or genre preference. Maybe experience something different from your normal guitar diet; if your a Rock addict see something classical or vice versa. Inspiration comes from understanding the wide and various performances possible on guitar.

See the program HERE

Cheers
Leigh

Posted by: Glenelg Guitar Studio | March 31, 2021

Students in FOCUS

He knew his scales

Students come in all shapes and sizes but the one thing they share is the FUN that learning Guitar can bring.

That is one of the great things about the Guitar. It fits all shapes and sizes as well as age groups and anyone can participate to enjoy learning at any level.

The Glenelg Guitar Studio website has a page dedicated to showcasing our students in FOCUS.

Check it out HERE if you haven’t seen it lately.

While you’re having a look at what others have achieved, think about joining them. Do you have a favourite piece or one you’ve been working hard on? We can organise recordings between terms as well as some weekends.

Performed somewhere recently and have the video, then maybe email it to me. Why not give it a try. I know it seems stressful but you will find it’s actually FUN.  Talk to me at your next lesson if you’re interested.

Cheers
Leigh

Posted by: Glenelg Guitar Studio | February 14, 2021

Recuerdos De La Alhambra

Recuerdos De La Alhambra.

I’ll translate that for my non Spanish speaking friends. It means Memories of Alhambra which is a classical piece arranged for guitar as well as other instruments.

Composed by Spanish composer and guitarist Francisco Tárrega (1852-1909). It requires the tremolo technique and is often performed by advanced players.

The piece was written for and dedicated to Tárrega’s patron Concepción Gómez de Jacoby in 1899, commemorating their visit to the Alhambra palace and fortress complex in Granada, Spain. It was originally entitled Improvisación !A Granada¡ Cantiga Árabe. 

Nana Mouskouri has performed a vocal version and Sarah Brightman has performed a re-adapted vocal version in her album Classics. Unfortunately both were unavailable to accompany me due to Covid 19 restrictions, however, I hope you enjoy my version of the piece.

Cheers
Leigh

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